Our favorite trellis is a favorite amongst farmers. We use a string trellis, which simply put, is created by running a garden twine between two stakes, weaving it around and back so there’s twine on either side of each tomato plant. 

How to trellis tomatoes

When your tomatoes reach about 18 inches, it is time to start trellising. You will need a roll of twine and scissors. Begin the trellising process by securely attaching twine to one pole at the height of the beds edge, above the silver bracket.

First Rung:   be sure the twine is secure and it horizontally across the length of the bed, alternating the twine in front of one tomato, behind the second, in front of the third, and so on. Tie the running end to the opposite pole securing with a double knot.

The rungs should be tight enough to gently support your tomatoes but should not cut into your tomato plant.

Once you secure your trellis rungs, trim any loose ends.

Second Rung:  Attach twine to the pole at the same height as first rung. Similar to the pattern you followed for the first rung, alternate the twine behind and in front of your tomatoes. This time where the last rung was in front of the tomato, run the twine behind the tomato, and vice versa. This will help with stabilization between tomatoes. Secure to opposite end with double knot.


Maintenance

Continue adding rungs at 3-4 inch intervals, alternating each rung in front of one tomato, and behind the next, making sure you are on the opposite side to the rung below. As your tomatoes grow you will continue to add more rungs.

Use your best judgement for interval spacing. The main goals of the rungs are to keep your plant upright and to help support branches as they become heavier with fruits. Your first two-three rungs may be spaced closer together and you may find the intervals between newly added rungs increases as your plant grows larger.

Weather can cause plants to wilt (super-hot days) and over-time twine can loosen. If this happens, pull the twine so that it regains its original line, and knot. For those extra heavy tomatoes, it can be beneficial to add a third pole to the middle of your line.